6 posts in this topic

Ever had the feleling of nausia whilst up on the snow hills skiing or snowboarding? Happened to me this weekend. I was totally free of alchohol for the whole week, so definitely no hang over. No flue either. The conditions were 200 meters of visibility, no trees on the slopes and not too many visual cues. Got that bad, I had to make my way down the slope very gradually, have break for an hour or so before I could have another go, only to get nausia again. The swaying of the ski lift did not help either. In contrast my son had no trouble what so ever.

Well looks like I am not the only one and they have a name for it, Ski Sickness. Dr Hausler in 1995 experienced it first hand and being part of the Ear Nose and Throat Department of the Swiss hospital decided to do a study of it, see:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ski_sickness

 

It is caused by your brain getting confused by contradictory sensory information from your inner ears, sight and feel from your feet. I have searched various forums and found it mainly happens in low visibility and or when there are poor visual cues of the landscape shape. So seeing things like trees can greatly help to reduce the effects. I am particularily suseptible to motion sickness in cars and boats, so no surprise that Ski Sickness affects me. I also had to take my prescription glasses off due to fogging, so my astigmatism further reduced my visual cues adding to the problem. I will try sea sickness tablets next time to see if that helps.

 

Any one else have this problem?

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58 minutes ago, SoutherlyBuster said:

t is caused by your brain getting confused

Now this I suffer from all the time!  Seriously though, while I've never had Ski Sickness, I have lost my bearings once in the forest where I couldn't tell which way was North or where the car was anymore - that was really disconcerting and certainly caused high anxiety and near panic.  But easily fixed, I bought a GPS the next week (and started carrying my compass).

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I'm a sook and suffer from motion sickness really badly as well.

I can't sit on the steps in our swimming pool and have a beer while the kids are splashing round in the water as I get nauseas. Tried scuba diving and threw up under water.:eek:

My first night land yacht sail at Lake Lefroy I got crook. It was bizarre to be following another landyacht that appeared to be stationary with the heavens flashing by. I pulled up and got out and walked round for a while to calm myself down. Got back in and caught up with the lads and only 15 mins later I was throwing up. Once I had "lost it", I was right though.

Even as a pilot sometimes it gets to me. After a couple of days of flying it's all good though with no more ill effects.

I don't even go out on boats unless it's a glass off. I get seasick crossing a wet lawn.:blush:

jhn.holgate likes this

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On August 13, 2016 at 6:41 PM, Chook said:

I'm a sook and suffer from motion sickness really badly as well.

I can't sit on the steps in our swimming pool and have a beer while the kids are splashing round in the water as I get nauseas. Tried scuba diving and threw up under water.:eek:

My first night land yacht sail at Lake Lefroy I got crook. It was bizarre to be following another landyacht that appeared to be stationary with the heavens flashing by. I pulled up and got out and walked round for a while to calm myself down. Got back in and caught up with the lads and only 15 mins later I was throwing up. Once I had "lost it", I was right though.

Even as a pilot sometimes it gets to me. After a couple of days of flying it's all good though with no more ill effects.

I don't even go out on boats unless it's a glass off. I get seasick crossing a wet lawn.:blush:

Sorry to hear you are so effected like this. The science behind this can be summarized as follows:  your balance systems is made up of three major components all working together. Sensors in your inner ear, vestibular sense (the sense of your body in space, e.g., with your eyes closed you can still tell what angle your elbow is bent at), and finally (and over abundantly for you) visual input. What makes riding behind another landyacht hard for you is your vestibular and inner ear senses are telling your brain one thing (in this case that you aren't really moving), part of your visual field is moving but an important central part of your visual field isn't.  Whammo, barf city.  :bad:

Taking the landyacht out of your central focus would probably help, but only a little.  Hard not to look at the bugger!  Even better would have been just to have closed your eyes for a while to remove the visual input altogether. Next time, next time... What could possibly go wrong? :pilot:

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Thanks for the info windstruck.

When I do get crook I do lay back with my eyes closed till it eases (as someone once told me) but I never knew why it worked.

I thought it was so I wasn't trying to lock onto the horizon and further muddle my senses.

Cheers for that.

 

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