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  • .Joel Pkd Brooza 3M Review

    By .Joel

    If you're a beginner looking to make the next step, this is the perfect kite! 

    Positives
    Value for Money
    Excellent Construction
    Stable in Gusty Winds
    Negatives / Considerations
    Handle Setup Lots To Catch
    Cleated Handles Can Loosen

    Introduction
    The PKD Brooza is an "intermediate" kite that is a step up from the popular entry level PKD Buster.  The Brooza is aimed as a stable buggy engine.

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    Unpacking
    The package PKD supply, like a number of the popular european brands has been very simple.  You get a stuff sack that contains your handles, lines and manual.  No fancy backpacks etc, which can be quite a positive as a quiver of 5 kites can take up half the space due to no extra hanging bits.  One thing I used to love about my PKD Buster was it was simply small enough to stuff under the seat of the car and pull it out when I wanted it.

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    Lines
    PKD supply their kites on Climax Dyneema lines, the lines are excellent quality and are knotted at the ends.  This means that you can adjust them over time as they stretch.  All lines with enough load will stretch regardless of brand, having knots in them makes it as simple as pegging one side of the lines to your washing line, walking them back and working out which one has stretched.  Untie the knot, move the knot and retie it.  This saves you having to cut and modify your lines after a long time.

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    Handles
    PKD Handles are light weight aluminium and comfortable.  They have a cleat style system on the bottom that makes it easy to adjust the length of your brakes without having to loosen lines and move them up and down the leaders on the handles.  Be aware that you need to ensure you have cleated the rope in properly, otherwise it will slip releasing the brake line and making it longer.

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    Bridle
    The bridles are very bright and catch your attention easily.  They are all colour coded which makes it easy to define which line runs from which row.  Europeans are notorious for tweaking their kites, adjusting their bridles to get the best possible performance to suit their style of riding.  Having bright and colour coded bridles makes it easier to identify which you are adjusting.  I should note, that there is no need to make any changes, and only do so if you are well aware of what you are changing and why.  The bridles are sleeved dyneema and are stitched at both ends.

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    General Construction
    The construction of the kite is a number of noticable steps above the Buster.  The finish of the bridle and sail is up there amongst the more expensive brands.  There is no area of the PKD Brooza that is lacking in build, it is strong, well finished and durable.

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    Flight Characteristics
    The PKD Brooza is an intermediate kite, and when flying the kite it is important to be aware of this.  The kite is a buggy engine, it is not really made for standing around and static flying.  Whilst you can static fly the kite, you must keep it moving.  A number of people will comment on the kite luffing for them, then you read about their static fly of the kite in a park, it is not designed for this.  Once you have the kite in a buggy and you are moving the kite is easily kept inflated, even with the few open cells on the front of the kite.  At the top end of the kite's wind range having a large number of closed cells is no problem, at the bottom end of the kite's wind range you are going to need to keep it moving.  

    The first time I flew a PKD Brooza was a very very strong wind and gusty day.  I was handed a demo 3.0m Brooza and took off up the beach with the kite, on my first run up the beach in a standard buggy I hit 74.1km/h.  This was my first run on the kite, in my hands for less then 10 minutes.  The Brooza due to the closed cells on the leading edge handled the gusts very very well, and for  a medium-low aspect ratio kite it pointed up wind considerably well.  The kite was well behaved and stable, when a gust came through it translated to power immediately without the kite luffing or jumping around in the window.

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    Conclusion
    If you are considering a larger PKD Buster I would definitely look at purchasing a Brooza.  The kites turn quicker, fly further forward in the window and point up wind better then the buster.  Whilst the Buster is great value for money, the extra few dollars spent on a Brooza makes it all the more worth it when looking at the overall improvement of the kite.  The PKD Brooza will also give you a lot more room to grow in to the kite.

    Photos thanks to Dyonysosd France


    View the PKD Brooza Gallery: 


    Edited by .Joel


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    User Feedback


    R1CH-G

    Posted

    Surprised there are no comments regarding this kite. Extremely stable fixed bridle complete with the AoA adjusters. Bought new, comes ready to fly with lines, handles, killers, PKD stickers, ground stakes, bean bags and drawstring bag. The price is right and it's a super stable kite!

    PKD's handles come complete with strop line ready to fly on a captive system. Infinite adjustment of brake lines via the clam cleat on the bottom of the handles.

    There was never an option with lighter materials - a Brooza in Porcher Marine would have been truly awesome. That said, it's a fantastic intermediate race-kite!

    This is a fantastic high wind kite - previous versions of this kite gave Windjammer his beach record in a buggy of over 68 MPH.

    Problems: PKD have stopped manufacturing them and replaced the Brooza with the Buster Soulfly - glad I got a full quiver of them prior to this!

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