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sherwinelioreg21

Most famous kite ever

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does anyone of you here have an idea of Ben Frank's kite?

.....experiment was successfully performed by Thomas Francois D'Alibard of France in May 1752 when sparks were observed to jump from the iron rod during a thunderstorm. G. W. Richmann, a Swedish physicist working in Russia during July 1753, proved that thunderclouds contain electrical charge, and was killed when lightning struck him.

Before Franklin accomplished his original experiment, he thought of a better way to prove his hypothesis through the use of a kite. The kite took the place of the iron rod, since it could reach a greater elevation and could be flown anywhere. During a Pennsylvania thunderstorm in 1752 the most famous kite in history flew with sparks jumping from a key tied to the bottom of damp kite string to an insulating silk ribbon tied to the knuckles of Franklin's hand. Franklin's grounded body provided a conducting path for the electrical currents responding to the strong electric field buildup in the storm clouds.

well, of course, all of us does not want to play with our kites under a thuderstorm conditions, but who knows, may be someone have been surprised by sparkles between kite parts? :D

post-8971-14336632408498_thumb.jpg

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I was talking to a young kiter a half a year ago and he complained of strange tingles in his ankles every time he landed a boost. Then he told me there was lightening and thunder. So there was enough static electricity in the air near him to conduct through his kite, his lines, through him and eventually grounding to earth every time he landed.

Once it dawned upon him what was going on, he decided to stop kiting that day. He was lucky to be still alive to tell the story.

So don't kite when there's lightening/thunder.

Regards,

Norman.

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Felt such static shocks before while kiting. indeed i landed the kite asafp and got the hell out.

ps it was an overcast day but no thunder clouds were present.

PSS aparently to this day no body has been killed by lightening while kiting. Tho i have heard of some close calls.

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Yerrp i can vouch for this experience as well. It occurs before,during and after a storm for obvious reasons.

Ive also had it happen during heavy rain and high winds. Scarey stuff,considering that those tingles I personally had experienced had been felt from a distance of 20cm off the ground or water when landing.

1000v per 1cm in air is the generalised concensis :yes3:

I highly recommend NOT trying to seek this experience.

Dave

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World Sport Kite Cup, Lakes Entrance, 1995, your truly is Field Director...

French team is out on the sand, doing their Precision routine, and one of the fliers says something to the team leader (in Algerian, I think, it wasn't French or English to my ears), then Ollie runs on from the sidelines, shouting, "Get those kites down, there's a thunderstorm coming in from the east."

If you think for a second, of course no one was looking to the east, that's where the wind was coming from!!!

Overheard from another team member, to their leader, "Auh, that's why my fingers were tingling!" (I can't remember exactly what she said, but it was close enough.)

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lol..lots of experiences from people here huh? so, it's not only ben frank.. :D

@Norman: so was he to day? did he totally stopped? maybe he can give another shot and just be cautious when there is thunderstorm..

@plummet: sometimes an overcast condition may trick us..glad you're ok..

@dave: "1000v per 1cm in air is the generalised concensis", now that's definitely scary..internal burns is possible :eek:

@grs1961: nice story..Frenchies might become French Fries if they were hit by the thunderstorm.. :D

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