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Home Brewed Kite Buggies

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Hey you left the lid up on your washing machine Andy!!! Only bloody thing I could see out of place in your clinically clean garage mate.:laugh2:

yeah, partly my OCD, partly living in a rental (who wants plaster walls in a garage?!) and partly having to clean up so the cat or gf doesn't get metal filings in their feet.

Awesome Andy!  What parts did you use to extend the siderails.  Are those black iron plumbing parts that attach to the original side rails?

its the thin wall steel tubing they have (same size as the PL side rails) and some 2 piece fencing couplings (like they use to build cattle yards), that I welded together to form a tube.

@andy666 what's the angle in the middle of the down-tube? And is the angle at the headstock the same as standard?

not sure on exact angles, it was built a few years ago and I just did it be eye, but I can measure it if you want. The down tube is at an angle to the headstock. 

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its the thin wall steel tubing they have (same size as the PL side rails) and some 2 piece fencing couplings (like they use to build cattle yards), that I welded together to form a tube.

not sure on exact angles, it was built a few years ago and I just did it be eye, but I can measure it if you want. The down tube is at an angle to the headstock. 

They are ELGATE fittings Andy.  http://www.cycladbuildings.com.au/data/elgate.pdf

I wondered about their strength by just bolting them. By welding them together it would be very secure. Great work!!!

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@gum-nuts, finding that angle is really just a matter maintaining the Rake of the front fork when you drop the front end of the seat, which I believe finishes out somewhere around 26 to 30 degrees (I think its 28 deg.) For those that don't know Rake is the angle of the front fork to the ground and is usually paired with the term Trail which is how far forward of the centerline of the front fork the wheel's axle sits.

There is a helpful conversation on Rake and Trail on Popeye's website: http://popeyethewelder.com/kite-buggy-questions-and-answers/forks-rake-and-trail

I once made a downtube for a buggy set up just like a PL bug by taking off the front fork and resting the clamp on a block at the height I wanted the seat and measuring the new angle of the downtube. From there I did the math to figure out what angles would be necessary to make the downtube finish out at 28 degrees coming off the clamp at the new angle. This was the resulting downtube which I later scrapped because I thought it was ugly... it did drop the seat down about 3 inches though:

474a5554-6f21-45ce-ace4-986a77e0d5f7_zps

 

Edited by soliver

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@gum-nuts, finding that angle is really just a matter maintaining the Rake of the front fork when you drop the front end of the seat, which I believe finishes out somewhere around 26 to 30 degrees (I think its 28 deg.) For those that don't know Rake is the angle of the front fork to the ground and is usually paired with the term Trail which is how far forward of the centerline of the front fork the wheel's axle sits.

The contact point of the wheel behind the rake of the forks where they intersect the ground equals trail.

The angle of the forks isn't terribly important as it only alters layover of the turning wheel. (within reason) The wider the tyre the steeper the rake angle.

Peter Lynn buggys have a "Huge" amount of trail. So dropping the downtube down more will only increase this further. A side load will try to turn the wheel all the time. I don't think it would make a whole lot of difference though on such a short coupled setup as a standard Lynn buggy. Your going to increase this further if the head angle isn't altered Mark.... Andy is onto it by fabbing up a completely new headstock.:good:

But what must be taken into account is the surface they are to be used on. If the wheel is sinking into a soft surface it is continually climbing a small hill and the trail angle/distance alters and gets even less.

Land sailing on a soft surface I use 40mm of trail and on Lake Lefroy's rock hard surface I only use 10mm. I like my buggies and yachts to head slightly into wind when I take my feet off the pegs. (When not over powered by the kite or sail.)

It's a good test to see how close I've got the setup.

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They are ELGATE fittings Andy.  http://www.cycladbuildings.com.au/data/elgate.pdf

I wondered about their strength by just bolting them. By welding them together it would be very secure. Great work!!!

elgate fittings. Thanks Chook, I knew a farmer would know exactly what they were 😉

I once made a downtube for a buggy set up just like a PL bug by taking off the front fork and resting the clamp on a block at the height I wanted the seat and measuring the new angle of the downtube. From there I did the math to figure out what angles would be necessary to make the downtube finish out at 28 degrees coming off the clamp at the new angle. This was the resulting downtube which I later scrapped because I thought it was ugly... it did drop the seat down about 3 inches though:

 

exactly how I did it.

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Looks fantastic!!!:good:

There is a lot of localized stress on the front T joint ??(front intersect of top and bottom rail)

 

Ha ha, I do love your nut and washer catcher built into the floor. Just wished I had a service pit in my shed. 

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