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jhn.holgate

Kiting Jamie on the Speed 5

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Cool. I'm hoping my boy will get interested in kiting one of there's years.

 

On a side not I'm hoping the 4.9m woo height is on water not land. I recon that's too high for a young lad. Lets face it, that's freak your legs and spine height if something goes wrong.

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1 hour ago, Kiting Jamie said:

4,9 m is however on land, it's all about technique and flying in save conditions and of course the right gear that secures a save jump and the right amount of float to make a soft and controlled landing.

 

Of course. But what happens when something goes wrong? rouge gust or lull? unplanned line or bridle failure? It can happen on new gear and yes even with flysurfer. Even a simple redirecting mistake? There is zero room for error to make mistakes jumping on land.

I'll be honest. I don't think anyone of any age should be jumping 5m high on land with only 10 months of experience. Let alone a child who doesn't fully comprehend the implications of what could happen with even one mistake.

Chasing additional  woo rankings on land is a slippery slope to push higher and higher and ultimately it will lead to pushing too far and a potentially life threatening accident.

Its great that you son is doing well and you are obviously very proud. But think about the worst case scenario. If that is death or significant spinal injury is it really worth doing?

My advice is to keep the jumps on land bellow 4m focus on technical riding/jumping. Get on the water and go banana's for the craziest jumps he can do. At least on the water there is a 99% chance of no injury if you crash from height. On the land its a 99% chance of injury if you crash from height.

 

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Hi Plummet,

Thanks for sharing your concerns and opinion regarding what Jamie is doing and i agree there will always be a level of risk involved but then it is an X-sport. But there are lots of precautions taken before starting a session inland, we constantly check the weather and windpatterns, no jumping allowed in gusty conditions, no overpowered flying, always wear a helmet and knee protection etc. And sure on occassion there could still go something wrong, surely on land a crash has a lot more risk involved then on the water. Jamie's water season is starting soon, wintertime in coming to an end in Holland so the real big jumps are made on the water, but you should be aware of the jumps that are made on land by dutch and german riders go up to 10 m. heigh. Jamie's got a brand new set of kites the Flysurfer Speed 5  6.0, 9.0 and 12.0, these are designed as jumping machines with a lot of lift and hangtime so smooth landings. Further there is a reason Jamie at his age is supported by Flysurfer and is allowed to fly kites that aren't designed for kids and that's the simple fact that he is a natural. Together with Flysurfer we take a lot of effort in training and coaching Jamie the right way and that is not being a daredevil but the opposite riding save and having fun is what it is all about. I'm just glad he's not playing soccer, seems they have a lot more injuries!

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Sweet. Keep him ripping and safe. Jumping a landboard is a glorious thing and its something not many people in the world can do or understand. I know the glory of the speeds I owned a speed 3 deluxe 15m for many years I've flown speed 4 and am currently riding ozone chrono. I'd love a spin on a speed 5 though.

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I think @plummet raises a very interesting question; Just how much risk should we let children face?

If we fence off all the cliffs and pools we used to jump into, ban catapults, pocket knives, tree houses or flying-foxes higher than a certain maximum height, restrict rock climbing, caving, white water kayaking/rafting, canyoning, traction kiting or riding motorcycles because of potentially fatal consequences, then how will kids ever learn to be able to enjoy these things safely later on in life?

Nobody wants to see their child hurt but how can they grow up being able to realistically assess risks and to understand and accept the consequences of their actions if they've never had to confront risk?
I believe it's up to us to teach them how and the only way is by exposing them to risk in a controlled way and developing their skills so they learn how to deal with it safely for the time when we're not there.

Well done @Kiting Jamie, your boy is developing into an awsome wind rider under your guidance

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4 hours ago, Mfwetu said:

I think @plummet raises a very interesting question; Just how much risk should we let children face?

If we fence off all the cliffs and pools we used to jump into, ban catapults, pocket knives, tree houses or flying-foxes higher than a certain maximum height, restrict rock climbing, caving, white water kayaking/rafting, canyoning, traction kiting or riding motorcycles because of potentially fatal consequences, then how will kids ever learn to be able to enjoy these things safely later on in life?

Nobody wants to see their child hurt but how can they grow up being able to realistically assess risks and to understand and accept the consequences of their actions if they've never had to confront risk?
I believe it's up to us to teach them how and the only way is by exposing them to risk in a controlled way and developing their skills so they learn how to deal with it safely for the time when we're not there.

Well done @Kiting Jamie, your boy is developing into an awsome wind rider under your guidance

it is an interesting question. And one only each parent can answer for their child. Because each parent will have a different level of what they consider acceptable risk, For each crazy individual out there pushing the limits of whatever they are doing there is most likely a parent that has allowed their child to do very risky things at a young age. My personal thought is that let the kids indulge in what ever risky activity they like as long as the most likely result of failure is bumps and bruises, maybe the odd broken bone.

If there death or paralysis is the likely outcome to equipment failure or accident then I think the child needs to be old enough to comprehend the actual risk prior to doing the activity and make there own decision. Take an extreme example You wouldn't take your child wing suiting flying though canyons  

In the case of jumping landboards at height we rely on a couple of lines and some fabric to hold us up. Imagine if there was a defective line set and one line snapped at 5m high. What would the outcome of that line breakage be?

 

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I fear this discussion is going into an endless loop. Rule out a deffective lineset, because you should check your gear every time you're flying. I personally wouldn't call a € 2000,00 Flysurfer kite "some fabric" to hold us up. If that were a criteria then nobody should be doing anything like this. Why is it so difficult to accept that  there is always the acceptional kid who really has the skills, really likes what he is doing, realises there is a risk but knowns his limitations and knows how to keep it as save as possible ! Let's instead focus on the beauty of the sport and the fun and rush it brings. Jamie wan't to be an ambassador to the KLB sport and make it accessable to anyone who likes to give it a try.

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That's what happens with internet forum chats the conversation can go in any way. I think we all accept and agree that your boy is an exceptional kid with great skills. There is no argument there. 

My above post is not aimed at your boy anymore it is discussing risk levels that parents should consider for their children. It is an interesting discussion with no right or wrong answer. 

But you do raise another interesting question and that is the trust we place on the equipment. The level of trust you place on your equipment is higher than the trust i place on mine. I base my premise that failures of equipment can occur. Even if that equipment is new. I have had a near new line set snap on me with no sign of wear or damage. I have seen a brand new line set on a brand new kite fail on the first flight mid jump. Luckily that guy was on the water as was my failed line set. 

On a side note. Do you yourself kite landboard and do high jumps on land? I assume you do and your boy is following in your footsteps? I think its really cool to get a father son thing like that going. Something you can share with them as they grow into adulthood.

 

 

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1 hour ago, plummet said:

What us a jart?

 

Take your pick - both pretty lethal

jart.png

Lawndart.jpg

3 hours ago, ssayre said:

@Mfwetu you forgot ninja stars and large survival knives (Rambo). Those were hot neighborhood black market items when I was a kid. 

Oh and rocket arm slingshots and jarts

Aaaah, remember the good old days . . .!

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@plummet , Yep @Mfwetu found it.  The yard game not the jar thing.  It was a game played like horseshoes.  You set the plastic rings out opposite of each other and underhand throw pointed and weighted darts to try and land within the plastic circle.  There were many accidents involving those in the late 70's early 80's if memory serves me.  I know my brothers and I lucky to be alive after trying to see how close we could throw them at each other.

 

 

jarts-then.jpg

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