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windstruck

Windstruck, literally

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7 minutes ago, the_hatman OBE said:

how are you healing, when do you reckon you'll be back out again.

Thanks for checking on me @the_hatman!  I'm quite a ways towards being on the mend. I haven't been doing much exercise other than taking walks with my dog and short, not too strenuous hikes. I hiked too hard a few days ago and my head felt mushy after so I backed down again. Shoulder and one particular spot on my chest (suspect torn cartilage, cracked rib) hurts quite a bit when I first wake up before I chug some ibuprofen.  All in all I can't complain!

i got in my buggy for a few laps on a grass field with my 6m Peak-2 in the air. Winds were highly "Janky" but it was my "getting back on the horse" ride nonetheless. Spent the rest of the session teaching a friend how to fly a DP from a harness (6m Access V6 with Re-Ride). He'd only previously flown a 3m trainer from a hand held bar.  Fun to get a new guy tasting the sport; should get him in the bug soon!

issues with my bride are another story. She wants me to quit all aspects of power kiting. I've agreed to not kite skate anymore but don't intend to give up Snowkiting or buggy riding. I have reworked my quiver to only consist of Peak2's and Access V6s, both "kinder, gentler" kites and I'm really working on my motor memory to get easily and quickly to the point of popping the chicken loop and all other manners of upping the chances of not getting lofted again. As we all know, however, none of us can remove all risk of injury in this inherently risky endeavor. Yeah, fun times. 

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10 minutes ago, the_hatman OBE said:

The wife is always a problem thay don't wont you to hurt your self, but they knead to remember if you don't get your adrenaline one way you'll get it another!

It is hard to tame the bear. Probably impossible. 

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I don't push it too hard and have always been lucky enough to avoid injury. There are days that I pack up if the gust factor exceeds my tolerance. Some days the wind just feels spooky and it's really hard to tell until you launch the kite. (Speaking of inland wind. The only wind I know)

I still think of kiting as very safe with the right approach. You can't really plan for freak accidents but they can strike whether your kiting or not.

kiting accidents have the potential to be more serious than rec league team sports but those have a higher frequency of injuries that can take you out of action IMO. Indoor soccer comes to mind. I finally quit being a goalie after a couple years of wear and tear. I still have trouble with my elbow and wrist after a year. 

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9 hours ago, windstruck said:

I have reworked my quiver to only consist of Peak2's and Access V6s, both "kinder, gentler" kites

Steve, have you heard of Nasa Star 3's??  They are the least lifty kites of all and great for gusty conditions.  You should get yourself a set...:grin:

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4 hours ago, jhn.holgate said:

Steve, have you heard of Nasa Star 3's??  They are the least lifty kites of all and great for gusty conditions.  You should get yourself a set...:grin:

Yeah, I've seen one or two!  I really liked them for buggying when the conditions were just right and you know I had the full set. Thing was, my local wind conditions were so Janky that I rarely seemed to have the right kite up in the sky, or I would have a good sized kite but only get good flying out of it half the session. I just came to find much better control with the Peak2s with all their broad wind range per kite and their ability to stay in the while I waited out the inevitable lulls. I sold or gave away all of my larger ones and kept my 1.5, 2.5, and 3.2m and set them up with Steffen's z-bridle pigtails. I figure I'll use them as fun kites to fly on the beach, but that look be static flying.  

The thing that brought me over the top was IBX earlier this year. Long, long runs on the playa were awesome with the Peak2s because I could get the kite set up in a park and ride position and then slide the little traction ball down to secure the bar and go pretty much hands free. I know you do this with you cheeseburger wrapper!  Once the ball is in place you have pretty much the same cruise control setup as with the NS3s but with the DP feature when you want it to boot. Best of both worlds to my way of thinking. 

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I flew fb foils, then switched to ns'2s and my sessions were easily twice as good since the ns2's sit deep in the window and will plow through the thick grass and didn't collapse in a lull.  Then I got the peaks and they are twice as good as the ns2's for my conditions.  Like @windstruck said, the wide wind range keeps you rolling.  I hate to admit it, but I don't think I've used the ns2's in the buggy since I got the 6m peak.  Maybe once or twice, but not sure about that.  I have however been using them continually for the longboard.  My ideal nasa star set up would be sets of maybe 4 of the sizes with one set on short lines and one set on long lines.  I'd probably use them for buggy more often if they were ready to go.  The peaks are just too easy to unwind and launch and I don't think I want to invest in extra control gear for the ns2's just for the convenience.

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3 hours ago, jhn.holgate said:

Yeah, you don't have to sell me on the Peaks - my NS2's have not had much air time over the last few trips when I've had the Peaks.  Couldn't help a friendly stir up though. :grin:

Peaks plural? I knew about the 6; you have more now?  Outstanding!  Enquirering minds want to know!  :party:

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1 minute ago, jhn.holgate said:

large.56c9090444149_Peak24m4.jpg

Junior Burger.....

Outstanding!  I love that little Junior Burger!  Freaky DP when you need it most. I had an absolute blast with my Junior Burger at IBX earlier this year when the winds were screaming and she was pulling like hell. I would go as fast as I'd ever been in a buggy and fly down the straightaway, then when I'd want to turn around I would let out the bar and start to slowly arc the buggy upwind over several hundred yards, all the time with the JB flapping like a furious bird under what felt like no power at all, come almost to a stop and then bring the buggy around, power up and whoosh, scream down the other way. Total kick in the pants.  

:Oh-shit:

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16 minutes ago, plummet said:

Are you hardwired Winstruck? That might be another idea for increased safety. Add 50kg of buggy weight you are far less likely to get lofted. FAR LESS LIKELY.

Thanks for the suggestion. At this point I have not considered such a setup, but I'm certainly open to entertaining it. No large bodies of water to circumnavigate or dive into as we've read about recently here on XK (!!) where I buggy. For me it's smallish grass athletic fields or a seven hour drive to Lake Ivanpah on the border of CA and NV. 

I Have read with interest the Hotwire threads both here and on PKF. Let me noodle on that. Thanks!

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To give you a reference point. last weekend's blue balls wind was 25-35 knots. I was flying a 6m reo inflatable. That has about the same power as a 6m access. We were flying about 1km inland from the sea with houses and small trees upwind. So there was some "janky" as hell winds coming through from kite lulling and falling out of the sky to 35 knot gusts depending on where you flew in the dune area.

When I was flying in the harness I felt the kite trying to lift be out of the buggy and the gusts fell bad through the harness. I felt unsafe. Once hooked in there was no lifting of the buggy and I could easily control the gusts. It was way safer and way more fun.

But you do have to overcome the fear of being "hooked into" the buggy. Once you do that you realise how much better it is.

 

 

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On 14/07/2016 at 8:04 AM, plummet said:

...The majority of loftings don't occur with high aspect kites. They occur with any type of kite being flown outside its wind range.

I can attest to that after having my 117Kg ass yanked clean off the ground by a 2m Ozone flow at the Blue Balls recently. (Luckily @plummet didn't see it happen or id still have the laughter ringing in my ears.)

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5 hours ago, BigTone said:

I can attest to that after having my 117Kg ass yanked clean off the ground by a 2m Ozone flow at the Blue Balls recently. (Luckily @plummet didn't see it happen or id still have the laughter ringing in my ears.)

Any man that flys a kite 25-35 knots gets kudos from me. That was a gnarly weekend of wind.

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I saw my neurologist earlier this week, and based on his reading of a follow up head CT, concluded that my chronic subdural hematoma has fully resolved.  I am thus freed from captivity!  Thank God, because I've been going crazy not getting powered about by wind since July 9th when my ascension (and inglorious descension) happened.  I've actually sold pretty much all of my skating gear as committed to with my bride so that chapter is officially behind me.  I now have an AQR installed on my buggy and only plan to snowkite in our world famous deep soft Utah powder (just as it says on my license plate "Best Snow on Earth") so hopefully my concussions and cranial bleeds are behind me.

To celebrate my return to wind powered fun I'm meeting some fellow kiters at Lake Ivanpah for a couple of days right before Thanksgiving in November.  Can't wait!

Sincere and heartfelt thanks to all of you who supported me during my recovery. 

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@windstruck just read this thread. I just wanted to say thank God you're on the mends (yes I am religious). Anyway... I think I've taken humble pie reading your incident. Lately I've been slacking off on the protective gear due to the humidity and heat we get here in the tropics. Landkiting is dangerous especially with gusts of course, but because I've been out on low to moderate winds, I've been naive in thinking nothing will happen to me. Just the other day I was taken by a gust and slammed on my chest. It didn't really hurt but it happened never the less. Fortunately the grass was not too short. But thanks for sharing your story. I really appreciate this wake up call!

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